Jail-breaks happened all the time

I recently read a very interesting story from CNN about human remains found have now been identified as a man who escaped jail over 100 years ago. (Article link & paste below)

I particularly liked this story because I know it was possible to cause major chaos and escape jails in our early years from articles I see in Nevada’s historic news pages. I have clipped a few to share —

The articles below show just a sample of cases from Nevada.

Prisoners had hacksaws, a bottle of acid, one escaped by digging out with a fork, others got away by faulty gates and locks, guard carelessness (leaving key in door), and one even cut the phone lines before fleeing!

A real tragedy — an inmate attacked a prison guard with an ax.

These stories are quite shocking.

All of the below are from The Silver State, The Daily Silver State, Silver State News, and one from Yerington Times: Year 1906, 1907, 1908, 1910, 1913, 1914, 1916, & 1920

 

These pages teach me a lot about the WHY we have certain measures in place today —

City Animal Control departments around the country now require dog and cat owners to license all animals – and the requirement for that? Rabies shots. I know that rabies used to ravage our communities from reading our historic papers. I am very happy we have rabies under control today.

Here in this case, we know why jails have such strict procedures – so inmates do not set fire to the jails, bring in hack saws and axes.

 

——- CNN story ——–

He escaped jail and was killed more than 100 years ago while on the run. His remains were just identified

https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/01/us/man-identified-100-years-later-trnd/index.html

loveless

(CNN) Bones discovered in an Idaho cave in 1979 and 1991 have been identified as the remains of Joseph Henry Loveless, a man who escaped from prison more than a century ago after being arrested for killing his wife.

The identification, confirmed by the Clark County Sheriff’s Office Tuesday, was initially made by non-profit volunteer organization DNA Doe Project, which said in a Facebook post that the “remains were preserved in the Buffalo Cave for as long as 63 years.”
Loveless likely died around 1916 at age 46, the organization said. He appears to have been killed and dismembered.
Before his death, Loveless had been arrested at least twice for bootlegging and escaped custody by sawing through jail bars, the organization said.
Around that time Clark County Sheriff Bart May said Loveless killed his wife with an ax and was incarcerated in what was then Freemont County. He escaped again, this time using a saw he hid in his shoe, the organization said. He was never seen again.
“Back in 1916, it was the wild West up here and most likely the locals took care of the problem,” May said. “We’ll probably never solve the homicide, but we still encourage anyone who has heard stories to contact our office, you never know what piece of information could help.”
DNA Doe Project had to overcome numerous hurdles before making a positive identification. Loveless used multiple aliases, had no close living relatives in the national database and was an off-the-grid outlaw who lacked official records.
The volunteers sifted through more than 31,730 individuals trying to find a connection to the man’s DNA.

The discoveries

The process of identifying Loveless’ bones has been 40 years in the making.
In August 1979, a male torso wrapped in a burlap sack was discovered by a family in a cave near Dubois.
“Wearing dark colored pants, white shirt with blue pin stripes and maroon sweater, the torso was buried in a shallow, 18-inch-deep grave,” DNA Doe Project said in a statement.
About 12 years later, a mummified hand was found, along with an arm and two legs wrapped in burlap in the same cave system. Volunteer staff and students from Idaho State University continued to comb through the cave but never found any other remains, including the body’shead, the organization said.
University anthropology professors and students worked with the organization’s volunteers to eventually come up with a tentative identification, which was sent to the sheriff’s office in November 2019.

A remaining relative

May said his office tracked down an 87-year-old grandson of Loveless who lived in California and agreed to meet with deputies and give a DNA sample.
Those results were analyzed by the organization and found to be 100% consistent with a grandparents/grandchild relationship, he said.
“The grandson had heard stories about their grandma and their grandpa,” the sheriff said. But the family stories about Loveless’ death didn’t match up with what the organization found through original records and newspaper articles, the organization said.
Loveless’ death remains an open case.
“We know he was murdered, but we don’t know who murdered him,” May said.
—————

Carrie Nation (aka Carry)

My father and I were dining the other day and he started telling me about a fascinating podcast about the temperance movement and of a 6 foot tall woman led the movement in her own way –  by destruction of the bars! She seriously would just walk in a bar and start smashing bottles of liquor. Now this rang a bell in my head, trying to recall the articles I have seen in my newspapers about a woman with a hatchet, crushing bottle after bottle to protest alcohol.

“Carrie Nation?” I asked him. “YES! that is her!” he answered.   How cool that something from my papers is known by my dad, who does not read old papers or history books. Now keep in mind I have a history degree and never knew of Carrie Nation until I saw her in my historical papers, but it turns out – she is very much well known. If you don’t know who she is, please look her up in the newspapers on Chronicling America. She is a fascinating woman!! In most of her photos, she is posing with a book and a hatchet. (I have some Nevada newspaper clips shared here too- see below!)

She was jailed many times and it never stopped her. She would make bail and would go right back at it! She lectured and would save the money made for bail. Look at her! She means business and you know it!

“I felt invincible. My strength was that of a giant.
God was certainly standing by me.
I smashed five saloons with rocks before I ever took a hatchet.”

I am a person who enjoys an occasion cocktail, or two, or three, and my father too. So, we started conversing about how the temperance movement began and why women were the lead in this. Nation claims she was led by G-d, but I wanted more of an explanation.

This seems pretty extreme today, right? Making sure alcohol is NEVER available to anyone.

I know Carrie’s first husband was an alcoholic and died of alcoholism.  But after further discussion, it started to make even more sense. Let’s think back to those years – late 1800s (around 1870-); women had no rights as citizens. The majority of women married or worked, not both, and if they did- the paycheck could legally go straight to the husband, because after all she was his property.

Women could not leave their husbands and secure good jobs and take care of themselves. In fact, often women who did leave their husbands were not allowed to take their children. Often they left with the clothes on their back only – the closet of other clothing belonged to the man of the house.

Women were suffering greatly during this time with staggering domestic violence issues. And, again, you see that they had no alternative to make sure their children had safe environments. Women were considered imbeciles by many – it would be normal for a woman not to testify in court because of the fact she is a woman- you can’t trust what they say.

 “You have put me in here a cub,
but I will come out roaring like a lion,
and I will make all hell howl!”

I know that the temperance movement was frequently framed by G-d and morals. But, removing the very things responsible for violence and crime was a way I did not see it before. Women trying to live a happy and safe life. Many were stuck at home, could not leave the man no matter his behavior. Now looking at the situation this way – it makes sense they went after the liquor. Men were coming home drunk from the saloons, abusing women and sometimes children- how else were they going to stop this? Doesn’t it make sense when you look at it this way?

Of course, I am sure there are other situations and views at play here – and I welcome them all to be mentioned, I find this story very interesting.

(Note, I did see an article in 1901 that Carrie Nation’s husband was granted a divorce.)

PS- I recently purchased this book, will start it soon and give you all an update at a later date.

the use of this life

 

citations:
The quotes I found on Wikipedia, along with the pictures.

Tonopah daily bonanza. [volume] (Tonopah, Nev.), 30 Dec. 1909. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86076142/1909-12-30/ed-1/seq-1/>

Tonopah daily bonanza. [volume] (Tonopah, Nev.), 29 Jan. 1910. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86076142/1910-01-29/ed-1/seq-1/>

Tonopah daily bonanza. [volume] (Tonopah, Nev.), 19 Sept. 1907. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86076142/1907-09-19/ed-1/seq-1/>

Tonopah daily bonanza. [volume] (Tonopah, Nev.), 13 Nov. 1907. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86076142/1907-11-13/ed-1/seq-1/>

Tonopah daily bonanza. [volume] (Tonopah, Nev.), 25 March 1911. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86076142/1911-03-25/ed-1/seq-1/>

Lyon County times. [volume] (Silver City, Nev.), 07 March 1903. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84022053/1903-03-07/ed-1/seq-4/>

Tonopah daily bonanza. [volume] (Tonopah, Nev.), 18 Jan. 1911. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86076142/1911-01-18/ed-1/seq-4/>

Tonopah daily bonanza. [volume] (Tonopah, Nev.), 26 Jan. 1909. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86076142/1909-01-26/ed-1/seq-1/

Tonopah bonanza. [volume] (Butler City [i.e. Butler], Nev.), 30 Nov. 1901. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86076135/1901-11-30/ed-1/seq-3/>

Carson City daily appeal. [volume] (Carson City, Nev.), 10 June 1911. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86076241/1911-06-10/ed-1/seq-4/>

Tonopah daily bonanza. [volume] (Tonopah, Nev.), 14 Jan. 1909. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86076142/1909-01-14/ed-1/seq-3/>

Carson City daily appeal. [volume] (Carson City, Nev.), 03 July 1908. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86076241/1908-07-03/ed-1/seq-2/

Morning appeal. [volume] (Carson City, Nev.), 30 Nov. 1901. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86076999/1901-11-30/ed-1/seq-1/>

Lyon County times. [volume](Silver City, Nev.), 16 Feb. 1901. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84022053/1901-02-16/ed-1/seq-2/>

Carson City daily appeal. [volume](Carson City, Nev.), 12 Sept. 1907. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86076241/1907-09-12/ed-1/seq-2/>

 

Batch accepted, to be online soon

Dear, friends of Nevada historic newspapers,

We just received word from Library of Congress that batch arrowhead has been accepted! This means the below title/dates will be online via Chronicling America in about 6 weeks.

Yerington Times, Yerington, 1907-1922

Lyon County Times, Silver City, 1906-1907

The Silver State, Unionville, 1875-1880

OVER 10,000 pages in this batch!

arrowhead

 

 

Happy Nevada Day & Hallowe’en

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Today is Nevada turns 155 years old! We were granted statehood October 31, 1864.

Battle-Born-e1540325362423

The Watertown weekly leader. [volume] (Watertown, Jefferson County, Wis.), 26 Dec. 1913. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85040721/1913-12-26/ed-1/seq-3/&gt;

Carson City daily appeal. [volume] (Carson City, Nev.), 05 May 1913. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86076241/1913-05-05/ed-1/seq-2/&gt;

Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.), 29 Oct. 1950. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1950-10-29/ed-1/seq-37/&gt;

The Goldfield news and weekly tribune. [volume] (Goldfield, Nev.), 29 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058376/1919-03-29/ed-1/seq-2/&gt;

Quick Video

Last month, September 2019, we made a trip to Washington DC to meet and share with others digitizing historic newspapers via National Endowment for the Arts and Library of Congress. We learned a tremendous amount from each other and ideas for outreach in our communities. I want to share a quick video made by our colleagues in Delaware. It is so good! I hope you find it informative!

Chronicling America